Hellebore Macros

Hellebore macro

Hellebores are intriguing plants because they hybridise so readily, giving rise to many different forms. If your knees can stand it, it’s worth bending down and lifting the flower to see what’s inside as the backs of the petals often give little clue of what’s inside.

While the inner petals can be clear, they’re often streaked, spotted, splashed or neatly edged with a contrasting colour. Some forms have enlarged nectaries or double rows of petals. Continue reading “Hellebore Macros”

Beware of the Flowers…

Floating hellebore flowers

…cos I’m sure they’re gonna get you, yeah.

You’re not sure what that refers to, perhaps? That bit of punk pop rock fluff from the 20th century passed you by, even though it’s reputed to have been voted the nation’s seventh favourite lyric of all time in a 1999 BBC poll? Lucky you have me, then.

You do recall this is the same nation that overwhelmingly voted for Boaty McBoatface as the name of our spanking new polar research vessel (and still imagines more popular votes might be helpful)?

If you were expecting something more meaningful to accompany these floating hellebores, don’t worry, I’ve got that covered too. Continue reading “Beware of the Flowers…”

Helleborus: Spotted Doubles

Hellebore spotted double

If I was asked for one word to describe the character of hellebores, it would be demure. That shows the dangers of generalising. These beautifully spotted, double blooms look like something out of musical theatre.

Helleborus x hybridus Ashwood Garden Hybrid - spotted double

I can’t help wondering what they are whispering about. Fear of slugs? The shipping forecast?  The best hairdresser in the county – should that be petaldresser?

For those hoping for something a bit more botanical, these are Helleborus x hybridus (Ashwood Garden Hybrids).

Plantlust

Hellebore flowers

Every now and again, we gardeners spot a plant we really want. Not having the space or the conditions it deserves doesn’t always help reduce the cravings, but when we’re lucky enough to have the perfect spot, we’re almost powerless to resist.

If the plant is a mass propagated, named cultivar (and we know the variety name and can find a supplier) there’s something we can do about it, when it’s not, it’s more tricky. I’ve recently been bewitched by a hellebore I saw in woodland at the Ness Botanic Garden that I fear falls into the latter category.   Continue reading “Plantlust”