Pedestrian Walkway At The Missouri Botanical Garden

Covered path at the Missouri Botanical Garden

I rarely take people pictures. It makes me feel sneaky (when I try to take pictures unobserved) or shy (when I’m spotted). I’d be hard pressed to estimate how long I’ve spent in gardens waiting for people to clear away from my shot and how often I’ve captured a random back or stray bottom by mistake when looking too excitedly at a flower to thoroughly check the periphery.  Continue reading

Brent and Becky’s Bulbs: a private tour

Daffodil e

It may seem unseasonal to post pictures of daffodils in the autumn, but far from it: if you live in the northern hemisphere, this is a great time to plant bulbs for flowers next spring. Meanwhile, the gardens of my Australian blogging buddies seem to be full of life all of a sudden, so I imagine it’s daffodil season there.

Either way, I’d only need the flimsiest of excuses to belatedly share pictures from our visit to Brent and Becky Heath, including some taken in their private garden, trial grounds and growing fields. I’m not a daffodil expert so please don’t ask me for their names!

The Bulb Shoppe

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Spanish moss at Magnolia Plantation, Charleston

Lake and skyline with Spanish moss

Sky is reflected in the lake around dawn at one of America’s largest romantic gardens. I’m at Magnolia Plantation with a group of garden writers: one of the best surviving examples of the romantic style of gardening. The idea is that gardeners should co-operate with nature, rather than try to control it. It’s a delicate balance.

The Spanish moss tumbling from the trees catches my eye – a Gothic plant if there ever was one. Ann Radcliffe would have approved.

Spanish moss at Magnolia Plantation

For more interpretations of this week’s theme, visit the Daily Post’s photo challenge.

 

 

Symbol: white picket fence

I took these pictures of fenced gardens earlier this year on a brief visit to the historic district of Colonial Williamsburg. I don’t see many white picket fences at home in Lancashire: dry stone walls are more our thing.

Garden fence

These fences seemed as much symbolic as functional: a way of staking a claim to an area; an imposing of some kind of order. The gates were unlocked so visitors could wander freely from one garden to another. In some places, they were low enough to step over.  Continue reading

A fine reward: Trillium recurvatum

Trillium recurvatum

If you follow my blog, you’ll be aware of my weakness for shade plants. I don’t mind at all that their flowers are rarely flashy: demure beauty is fine by me.

I’m from a part of the world (Lancashire, England) where wandering in the woods – I was going to say ‘is a commonplace experience’, but nature rarely offers that, so far as I’m concerned, so I’ll make myself clearer. At home, we walk in the woods for pleasure, exercise, fresh air, to enjoy the season: it doesn’t normally involve risking many dangers.

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