Thursday Doors: Blue Sky Door

Door painted with landscape and a floating armadillo

This characterful door hasn’t experienced much traffic lately, as the untrampled wildflowers bear witness. It is part of the South Austin Museum of Popular Culture (Southpop) complex on South Lamar Boulevard, Austin, Texas – or just around the corner from it.

I found this picture particularly tricky to write alt text for. How do you describe it in just a few words to a person who can’t see it? Continue reading

Two Views Of The Isle Of Man

Scenic view, Peel, Isle of Man

We all have our favourite views – the first is one of mine. The couple are taking in the view from Peel Hill on the west coast of the Isle of Man as sun starts to set over the harbour. We’d been hoping to snag the bench ourselves, but, as it turned out, their presence made the view sweeter. When they’d had their fill, they made their way back down, giving us chance to take our turn. Continue reading

The Healing Urban Garden

Healing Urban Garden, Hampton Court

I’ve been meaning to share this picture of the HUG (the Healing Urban Garden) designed by Rae Wilkinson for the Hampton Court Flower Show. The garden looks much more open viewed from the front, but from this angle, it’s easier to see the style of the planting, which is densely packed and surprisingly linear. That’s the part of the garden that fascinates me.

It’s an interesting, textural effect, reminding me of the rows commonly used in crop gardens, such as cutting gardens or kitchen gardens. I wonder if for some people, the sense of order and rhythm underpinning the design makes it more relaxing? If asked beforehand, I’d have said I preferred plants to mingle together naturally, but something in my pattern-loving nature responds to the technique, especially as it’s not rigidly applied.

The plants included lots of aromatic perennials and healing herbs, such as lavender, artemisia, thyme, stachys, rosemary, salvia, allium, eryngium and nepeta. The calming, subtle colour palette of silver, blue and green was lifted by purple, the bronzy foliage of head-high, multi-stemmed trees and lavender, the latter carried through to the walls and accessories.  Continue reading