March Giveaway: Two Free E-books from Hinterlands Press

I rarely reblog – this is only my second time in seven hundred posts. Regular readers may have noticed Laurie Graves’s insightful and unfailingly supportive remarks in my blog’s comments section. Laurie, a talented writer, is offering us the chance to download the first two ebooks in her Great Library Series of YA fantasy novels free of charge on Amazon until March 14th 2020. Continue reading “March Giveaway: Two Free E-books from Hinterlands Press”

Vertical Form (St Ives) By Barbara Hepworth With Reflections

Vertical Form (St Ives), a bronze sculpture, with reflections
Vertical Form (St Ives) in the window of the Barbara Hepworth Museum

I do like this picture, although it has as many accidental elements as purposeful ones: layers, patterns, textural contrasts and red herrings.

Although I lined the sculpture up reasonably well with the r/h edge of the frame, the reflections make it look all catawampus. That doesn’t just allow me to use the word my sweetheart taught me (we would say ‘skew whiff’) but it also makes the picture seem more abstract. That seems fitting.

I tried cropping closer, but prefer the picture with the distractions in. They have an unsettling effect and they provide context for a bronze sculpture that has St Ives in its name.

I suspect the reflections of the houses humanise the bronze more than if the clean lines of a gallery were behind it. The sculpture seems to gaze out, watchfully or wistfully.

The colour combination is muted – natural stone, grey, plus a languid take on the traditional blue and white that symbolises Cornwall – helping the gleaming sculpture hold its own visually in the gallimaufry. Continue reading “Vertical Form (St Ives) By Barbara Hepworth With Reflections”

Stone In The Northern English Landscape

Bronte bridge
Brontë bridge as it is now

Today’s post is a celebration of stone. I’ve grown up seeing it used for buildings, country walls, and paths and miss it when I spend time in places where it is not so readily available. Stone is ancient and helpful: it softens, steadies, anchors.

My first stone bridge has pedigree. It’s one that the Brontë family used to cross the river across from the waterfall on the path that leads over the moor from Haworth to Top Withens. Actually the original bridge was swept away in a flood and this is a replacement, made to a similar design.  Continue reading “Stone In The Northern English Landscape”

Blog

Rose garden in flower during Rosemoor's Festival of Roses

I’m in the process of refreshing my blog’s theme. If you usually visit me via The Reader, all’s well – you’ll not notice any difference.

Regular readers who read directly on my site or sometimes pop over to see what’s going on (thanks for that!) might notice a few changes, especially as I’m still tinkering and moving things round.

Some parts will be a little better and some, no doubt slightly worse, but WordPress users will know that’s pretty much how things go. All themes are compromises and we just have to be happy we can change them if we want… assuming we can remember how, which is something entirely different!

Hopefully, everything will settle down in a day or two.

Wish me luck!

If you’re here to see roses, there are lots on my site. Use this link.