Square In September: ‘Wisley 2008’ Rose

Cluster of pink roses with open rosette shapes

Three, shapely, pure pink rose sisters spent their brief lives bouncing together in a pretty cluster in a rose garden. As you see, I visited them in their prime.

Unlike many of the larger, heavier, multi-petalled varieties, the flowers of Rosa ‘Wisley 2008’ face upwards and outwards to show off their rosette forms. Those who read last Sunday’s post may be disappointed that the leaves are ‘just’ mid green, more remarkable for their tendency to resist disease than for their colour, even when grown in a rose garden where the proximity of others makes it easier for rose nasties to spread and take hold. 

The name is a little of a curiosity. Our spellcheck tried to insist on Wisely, then Wesley, but I was not in need of correction: the rose celebrates the wonderful RHS garden, Wisley, in Surrey. ‘2008’ was added in differentiation when this second rose was released to replace the original ‘Wisley’ when it was withdrawn from sale four years after its launch.

An internet search reveals very little trace today of the first rose, which was a brighter shade of pink and had a fuller, much more fragrant flower. That sounds good on paper, but it became clear that it thrived less well in the average garden than it had done in the trial fields. Sic transit gloria mundi (the rose version). Funny how the spellcheck is fine with Latin!

Each Sunday I’ll be sharing a square cropped picture of a pink rose as part of Becky’s Square In September challenge. It’s a daily challenge but we are cordially invited to dip in and out as we please. The main photograph should be square and the subject should reflect her prompt In The Pink.

30 thoughts on “Square In September: ‘Wisley 2008’ Rose

  1. margaret21 says:

    This post about names is very apposite, and I wonder if I could pick your brains, as you are something of a rose expert. In keeping with family tradition, I want to buy a plant for my newest granddaughter, the very premature one. One that celebrates her name. The only problem is that the rose Zoë sems to be a bit of a toughie in that it’s not tough at all, and prone to all kinds of problems. My green fingered daughter-in-law has little success with any roses in their clayish London garden. I don’t want to take your time, but any off-the-top-of-your-head thoughts would be much appreciated.

    • susurrus says:

      I never think it is a good idea to buy a rose because of the name, unless you would still want it if the name was something else. The same must apply for other plants, so you’re right to be cautious. You can buy plant names, but you’d be better off buying a house with the money a rose would cost from a top breeder.

      There is a perennial viola called ‘Zoe’. It’s small, like Zoë is at the moment and sweetly scented. A labour intensive, longer term project could be to grow seeds of something that is variable from seed and doesn’t need care in the garden – a hellebore hybrid for example – and name the prettiest and most flourishing one yourself for Zoë. By then she will be old enough to help you pick the best one out! My sweetheart’s daughter is called Zoë and he might know of something. If he does, I’ll let you know.

  2. Oddment says:

    How beautiful! And what a wonderful beginning to my week! As to Spellcheck, phoo. For every once it saves me from myself, twenty times it drives me to unseemly thoughts when it won’t let me do what I quite knowingly want to do. Thanks to you and Becky for this lovely Sunday nosegay!

    • susurrus says:

      Unseemly thoughts, eh? Only teasing, it does the same to me. I admire the dedication it takes to stop ‘phoo’ being helpfully turned into ‘photo’.

      Derrick has inspired me to look for a solution (see above).

      • Oddment says:

        I see by the comments this morning that I may not be the only one with unseemly thoughts inspired by Spellcheck. I can get it to ignore itself temporarily, but not permanently. Any time we can outsmart Hal, I’m jubilant, so I hope you’ve hit on a way.

  3. Vicki says:

    Gorgeous.
    The WP spellcheck drives me crazy, Susan. I can correct some of the words 5-6 times, think I’ve overridden the mysterious word, publish and then…….it’s wrong again.

    This rose is a stunner. So hard to get roses with their heads turning up for a photo session.

    • susurrus says:

      This rose is very handy that way. You can try to prop nodding roses up with something while you take their portrait, but they tend to develop a sulky droop under pressure to respond to gravity other than by their own will.

      Re the spellcheck, see my reply to Derrick, above, if you have a moment.

  4. maristravels says:

    For all who have trouble with WP spellcheck may I recommend the free version of Grammarly? It is brilliant for those of us who make many typos because it picks these up as spelling mistakes and underlines them when, with just a click of the mouse, it gives the opportunity to change the spelling to the one it offers, ignore it, or add it to the dictionary. It is American but you can opt for English spelling.
    Lovely rose, Wisley 2008. I’m a big fan of roses and grow some for their fragrance and some for their profusion, all of which are still blooming in my garden and look set to continue for a long time. I’ve installed a bower for the first time this year with a pale pink James Galway on one side and a deeper pink Strawberry Hill on the other, and hopefully, they will be intertwined by next year. Meanwhile, they also play host to purple clematis.

    • susurrus says:

      My fingers are crossed that they will. Is it a relatively small bower? The issue with the spellcheck is we can’t turn it off (so far as I know) and it intercedes where it is not needed. I’m exploring though, so thanks for the tip!

  5. BeckyB says:

    Oh this is a stunner. You said not as fragrant as the original but hope it still has a lovely scent.

    PS and I’m so glad you are going to be joining us weekly 😊

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