Rosa ‘Bathsheba’, An English Climbing Rose

Bathsheba climbing rose has large, apricot flowers

My sweetheart uses the term ‘mannerly climber’ to describe a rose that will climb rather than swamp any structure provided for it by human carers: if the rose produces a succession of elegant, petal-packed rosettes, that’s so much more courteous of it. Rosa ‘Bathsheba’ is a fine example of a mannerly climbing rose.

Pictures rarely tell the full tale of any plant, particularly not a rose. We miss out on the fragrance (strong, flowery myrrh, since you ask) and find it hard to judge the size of the flowers. These are large ones, with a hint of a button eye that becomes Bathsheba very well.

Rosa Bathsheba

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The Very Fragrant Rose ‘Gertrude Jekyll’

Pink rose with a beautiful rosette shaped flower

On Sundays, I’m sharing a square cropped picture of a pink rose as part of Becky’s Square In September challenge. We are invited to dip in and out of this daily challenge as we please. She’s looking for a post where the main photograph is square and the subject is In The Pink.

Several people have asked if the roses I’ve been sharing this month are especially fragrant. Last week’s was not, so I promised a highly scented one for this week and I have kept my word. Rosa ‘Gertrude Jekyll’ has as strong and lovely an Old Rose fragrance as anyone could hope for. Scratch and sniff!

(It might work, if you have an active imagination).

Rosa Red Cascade: A Repeat-flowering Miniature Climbing Rose

Rosa 'Red Cascade'

Some of the most picturesque American roses (to my British eyes, at least) have been encouraged to clamber over fences. That’s how Rosa ‘Red Cascade’ managed to sneak its way into my heart. If ever a rose was destined to make a plain fence seem more interesting, this is it. The first time I noticed it growing was in tough conditions, in full sun, on a mesh fence, in a graveyard in Jackson, Mississippi. If it had been flowering at all, I’d have been impressed, but this plant was liberally covered with red blooms.

While ‘Red Cascade’ is often sold as a miniature climber, ‘miniature’ describes the flowers more accurately than the habit of the plant. The Antique Rose Emporium has trained one to grow up a 15ft (4.5m) pillar.  Continue reading

Enveloped in roses

Rosa Constance Spry

This week’s photo challenge is enveloped. Once happily established, a climbing rose will cover its support, then smother it with blooms. Rosarians explain that the trick is to match the potential size of the plant with the scale of the structure you want to clothe. Choose a rose that is too vigorous and you’ll have the heartbreak of cutting many healthy flowering stems away. Get it right and you’re in for a treat!

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Seven Sisters Rose

Seven Sisters RoseThis striking old multiflora climbing rose was named after the seven heavenly sisters of ancient mythology – the Pleiades – who are also commemorated in the name of a star cluster in the constellation of Taurus.

The name is very apt: its scented flowers gradually change colour as they mature, so shades of carmine, purple, pink, mauve to almost silver appear on the plant, creating the effect of several roses, closely intertwined.

Photographed at Coton Manor, Northampton, England, where it grows around the traditional, mullioned windows.