A Favourite Oak Tree

Oak on the edge of a buttercup meadow

A wider shot of the oak in context on the edge of a buttercup meadow might leave you unsure which tree has made my favourites list.

Oak in November
November

It’s the one on the left that looks like two when its structure is laid bare by autumn: an oak tree in elegant decline.

Peering under the canopy reveals more of its story. The tree is supporting itself on a hefty, forked branch that has grown down to the ground and, most likely, rooted there.

Oak tree propped up by a rooted branch

Muscular branches prop and lean, wind and interlock, giving the impression of something wrestling itself.

Oak in June
June

Like all mature oaks, it is host to a wide range of insects, animals and birds, and is connected to an underground community we are only just starting to understand.

Shared for Becky’s TreeSquare.

38 Replies to “A Favourite Oak Tree”

  1. My gosh! I wonder how old that oak is. Wonderful descriptions, but I was especially taken by “Like all mature oaks, it is host to a wide range of insects, animals and birds, and is connected to an underground community we are only just starting to understand.”

    1. It does not seem really old, but it’s not young either. I’d love to be able to look at a tree and be a lot more accurate than that!

    1. Their branches seem to be a lot more free than other trees, as if they are not constrained in the same way by having a pattern to follow.

  2. Oaks are so amazing, especially the ones that are older than I am. I’m so glad you took the close-ups because I think you need both the whole structure and the intricate parts to truly appreciate them.

  3. wow what a tree, they are just incredible oaks. Do hope in a hundred years there will be others as old and fabulous as this one

  4. You have some spectacular old trees with lots of character, Susan. I follow a photographer from the UK on YouTube who shoots in a lot of small woodlands with trees having all sorts of shapes. They are wonderful.

  5. I can see why it’s your favourite. I once had a woman write a historic tree column for me. So many stories these trees can share.

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