Tips for photographing roses 6: not all roses are equal

Crown Princess MargaretaI’m sorry to have to say this, especially as we think of roses as beautiful flowers, but I believe that some varieties are just more photogenic than others. We know that it’s true of people: why would roses be any different?

Four times out of five if I pick a nice, open bloom of certain English Roses – I’m thinking of  ‘Crown Princess Margareta’, ‘Wildeve’, ‘Constance Spry’, ‘Grace’ or ‘A Shropshire Lad’ – I’ll be able to get a shot I like, quite quickly, from a variety of angles. The individual roses don’t even need to be perfectly formed: a few stray petals just seem to add to the grace of the flower. Continue reading “Tips for photographing roses 6: not all roses are equal”

Tips for photographing roses 5: experiment with the format

Tips on photographing roses 5: experiment with the format

It’s a simple but effective tip, but from time to time, turn your camera round. Looking through Flickr, I’m always surprised that so many amateur flower photographers take virtually all their pictures as landscapes. I think they’re missing a trick: individual flowers and clusters of roses are often better suited to a portrait format.

It’s easy to fall into the habit of holding your camera a particular way round: it might be so instinctive that you may not even notice it.

Continue reading “Tips for photographing roses 5: experiment with the format”

Tips for photographing roses 3: work with nature, not against it

Tips-for-photogrphing-rosesEver seen a field of yellow sunflowers in an open field in Tuscany, all obediently facing the same way? It’s a beautiful sight, though it always looks a little eerie to me – such clear proof of the irresistible pull of the sun.

If they were humans, we can be sure there’d be a few rebels amongst them. But plants tend to grow to face the sun to a greater or lesser extent. Continue reading “Tips for photographing roses 3: work with nature, not against it”