Hollyhocks At Arley Hall

Hollyhocks seem to tower over a cottage at Arley Hall

The Tudor-style Tea Cottage at Arley Hall in Cheshire is a focal point leading the eye down a broad path. On either side of the path are cottage garden style flowers, such as these flailing hollyhocks, which grow alongside a collection of summer flowering shrub roses and extend the season of interest. The Tea Cottage has been superseded by The Gardener’s Kitchen, but is used for exhibitions, filming and weddings.

For more posts that include pictures from Arley Hall, click here.

Floral Lookbook: RHS Hampton Court 2018

Single hollyhock with cream flowers and bold purple eye
A. Alcea rosea ‘Halo Cream’ with foxgloves
Coral coloured agastache with companion flowers
B. Agastache ‘Kudos Coral’ with Scabiosa ‘Barocca’, Agapanthus ‘Navy Blue’ and Achillea ‘Terracotta’
Double pink hollyhock with foxgloves
C. Alcea rosea ‘Apple Blossom’ with foxgloves
White agapanthus with ornamental grass and richly coloured flowers
D. White agapanthus with ornamental grass, achillea, scabiosa, daucus corata and helenium
Foxglove with pale peach flowers, and darker spots
E. Digitalis ‘Dalmation Peach’ with hollyhocks in the background

Continue reading “Floral Lookbook: RHS Hampton Court 2018”

Weekly Photo Challenge: Resilient

I’m often surprised to see plants growing in strange places with little obvious means of support, such as this colourful succulent on top of a wire cage filled with rocks. Luckily for us, nature is resilient. These hollyhocks seemed quite content with poor soil at the base of a stone cottage in the Cotswolds, adapting to their surroundings by leaning outwards to catch more light.

I posted earlier this week about resilient plants that grow almost wild in a cemetery (if you’re a rose lover, and missed the post, you can find it here).

It’s impossible for me to write on this prompt without mentioning my belief that climate change is a real threat to us all. Let’s not push nature too hard or blithely take for granted her ability to bounce back. Resilience doesn’t mean invulnerable.